Tag Archives: fragrance chemicals

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Get something stinky
as a gift?
Don’t toss it
on the street
or in the trash.
Don’t regift it
to a friend
or enemy.
Don’t donate it
to a charity.
Do send a message
loud and clear!

Now’s the time Continue reading

Health Canada and Chemicals in Fragranced Products

This report from the Auditor General of Canada came out in 2016. Nothing has changed as far as I have seen, and I keep my eyes open for these kinds of things.

“The Office of the Auditor General of Canada (OAG) conducts independent audits and studies that provide objective information, advice, and assurance to Parliament, territorial legislatures, boards of crown corporations, government, and Canadians.”

Here’s a short video, followed by the transcript,  more from the report, and some relevant bits from a follow up by Health Canada:

Chemicals in Consumer Products and Cosmetics

 

Video Transcript

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Unilever to Disclose Some (but not all) AXE and Other Fragrance Ingredients

Unilever, the company responsible for making disabling products like AXE (aka LYNX) has announced they will be expanding their product ingredient lists  to include fragrance ingredients above 0.01 percent (100 parts per million) in a product’s formulation (via the SmartLabel app, but not on the actual labels *)

Here’s what we need to know:

* 20 parts per million (ppm) is the FDA’s standard for ‘gluten-free’ *

Which means that people who are allergic or “sensitive” can suffer serious and life threatening effects from substances at well below 100 ppm, and we still won’t know what is causing the symptoms, or what we need to avoid to stay alive.

unilever-banner

This plan may help people who aren’t knowingly or immediately affected by fragrance exposures to choose their products more wisely, but it doesn’t go nearly far enough to help those of us who are disabled by or have life threatening reactions to their products.

Edited to add:

Unilever’s fragrance transparency is a major green-wash at 100 ppm, when gluten-free has to be below 20 ppm, and people with isothiazolinone (aka MI) allergy react to as little as 3 ppm, perhaps less.

Also,  long-term health limit for fumes from dry-cleaning solvents has dropped from 20 parts per billion to an infinitesimal 2 parts per billion because long-term exposure to even very low concentrations can result in cancer, as well as fetal development problems for pregnant women.

Other interesting tidbits about Unilever:

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School Boards to Pump Peanut Fragrance Into Schools!

peanut fragrance 1

Imagine if that were to happen?

How many people have peanut allergies?

“In the U.S., approximately three million people report allergies to peanuts and tree nuts. Studies show the number of children living with peanut allergy appears to have tripled between 1997 and 2008.”

The rise in peanut (and other food) allergies has been linked to the rise of toxic chemicals used by the food industry. Fragrances are also full of toxic chemicals.

How many people have fragrance allergies or “sensitivities”?

Continue reading

Imagine Being Disabled, Confined, and Invisible

Imagine being disabled (as if drugged, dysfunctional, and definitely disbelieved more often than not) from exposures to legally allowed toxic chemicals in everyday products and materials…. or from wireless signals coming from  neighbourhood wifi networks and cell towers…

Now imagine that some of us don’t have to imagine this scenario, because we can feel our brains and bodies being harmed by the exposures just like canaries in the mines did.

Imagine being confined to a safe bubble of a home to avoid disabling exposures, Continue reading

Are the Wrong People in Solitary Confinement?

Who should be isolated?

The poisoned or the poisoners?

When we develop MCS/ES, we are told to avoid the triggers that disable us. Yet, far too often, fragrance chemicals are the biggest triggers of disabling effects, yet they are in everything, and everywhere now.

To follow doctors orders, and to have some quality of life (like the ability to look after ourselves), when others at work or elsewhere won’t stop using toxic products,  we have to stay isolated in our homes (if we’ve found a safe one).  It’s just like being in prison… but for crimes we did not commit.

WE who are immediately disabled by these harmful pollutants are being forced into prisons of isolation for crimes the chemical and fragrance industry are committing, like when they hide  oil and gas industry toxic waste chemicals into everyday products and materials, without listing them on labels, they are causing a public health crisis, a crisis that  most people are unaware of.

WE who become disabled are being imprisoned for their crimes of saturating people (and our air and water) with toxic chemicals, and so, if we are to be able to see our friends and loved ones, we need to be protected from them, in environments kind of like this:

 

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What I Wear In Bad Air :: Marie

2016 Marie LeBlanc 1

“I have to  wear my mask to do laundry in the basement because of mustiness and other people’s fragrances.”

~ Marie LeBlanc

Marie also shared an artistically altered image of her wearing her mask while waiting to see a doctor, because people were ignoring the fragrance-free signs on the wall behind her. Continue reading