Tag Archives: systemic barriers

Three New Videos About Environmental Sensitivities

 

EHAQ (Environmental Health Association of Québec) is presenting three new videos for

Environmental Sensitivity Awareness Day – May 12, 2019

Presentations are from:

John Molot MD.

“Numerous papers have been published supporting a biological explanation for MCS. These will be reviewed as well as the evolving medical and political perspective.”

David Fancy Ph.D.

…”Drawing from insights from the ‘social model of disability’ this presentation identifies how the current cultural moment presents systematic barriers, negative attitudes and ongoing electromagnetic wounding that puts the responsibility on society for being the main contributing factor in disabling EHS persons.”

Meg Sears Ph.D.

…” Sears notes the urgency of curbing harmful products and thus chronic disease because as people are getting sicker, families and society also suffer and the healthcare budget balloons faster than the Gross Domestic Product – clearly an unsustainable situation.”

 

The videos are available in both English and French.
There’s no need to register this year, just visit the website:

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Why I LOVE Having Environmental “Sensitivities”

Guest post

In all of this I don’t have a permanent place to stay and paid rent to a landlord who won’t fix anything, my apartment insurance cut me off and won’t help with my possessions, my medicare health insurance is not covering the health aspect and my one doctor wants me to see a doctor out of province which is not covered, and my social assistance did not pay me my disability this month, and family does not understand any of this….At this point I have nothing to lose and everything to gain….I AM MOVING FORWARD!

~ Marie LeBlanc, Manitoba, Canada

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Are the Wrong People in Solitary Confinement?

Who should be isolated?

The poisoned or the poisoners?

When we develop MCS/ES, we are told to avoid the triggers that disable us. Yet, far too often, fragrance chemicals are the biggest triggers of disabling effects, yet they are in everything, and everywhere now.

To follow doctors orders, and to have some quality of life (like the ability to look after ourselves), when others at work or elsewhere won’t stop using toxic products,  we have to stay isolated in our homes (if we’ve found a safe one).  It’s just like being in prison… but for crimes we did not commit.

WE who are immediately disabled by these harmful pollutants are being forced into prisons of isolation for crimes the chemical and fragrance industry are committing, like when they hide  oil and gas industry toxic waste chemicals into everyday products and materials, without listing them on labels, they are causing a public health crisis, a crisis that  most people are unaware of.

WE who become disabled are being imprisoned for their crimes of saturating people (and our air and water) with toxic chemicals, and so, if we are to be able to see our friends and loved ones, we need to be protected from them, in environments kind of like this:

 

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The Effort and “Inconvenience” of Single-Handedly Trying to Remove Systemic Barriers to Access

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When she needed accommodation, you won’t believe the rigmarole that ensued.

(unless you have MCS/ES)

equal opportunity 1

“They should not have to make significantly more effort to access or obtain service. They should also not have to accept lesser quality or more inconvenience.”

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Someone with MCS (who wishes to remain anonymous) was asked about how her efforts to receive appropriate, safe, accommodation were going, so she could see a health care provider. She is one of a growing number of people who become disabled from exposures to toxic chemicals found in many everyday products and materials, especially in fragrances.

This is pretty much how the story goes:

She contacted a health care provider by phone and talked to a receptionist.

She asked her if they had a scent-free policy and was told they didn’t.

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Home Dental Extraction SUCCESS (#2)!

Another One Bit the Dust

I survived my second home extraction on the weekend. It was a very infected tooth, an upper rear molar, one that I had somehow managed to retain a year longer than expected. It was actually the first one to get infected last year, but then the other tooth went ballistic, and by the time that extraction site healed, this tooth had calmed down enough to be very useful for eating with.

In hindsight, waiting so long may not have been such a great idea, as in the end, the infection was nasty. Very nasty. It put me into a terrible funk that was really difficult to push my way through, similar to the depression some kinds of mold can cause, and created the same challenges MCS/ES exposures cause, like brain fog, difficulty thinking and doing things, and a real lack of energy. And it stank when pulled. Really stank.

I am so grateful for the home visiting dentist in this area. Not only is he fragrance-free, but he is willing (and able!) to take other precautions to make things safe for me.

Last year, before my first home extraction, we discussed everything that was needed for the procedure, and what was necessary to make it as safe as possible for me.

This year I couldn’t find my old list (despite seeing it a month or 2 ago) and hoped he remembered his. This is what I do remember, and what we did:

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Random Thoughts About Having a Socially Inconvenient Disability

“I just love having a socially inconvenient disability”
~ said no-one ever

socially inconvenient 1said no one ever 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Having a disability that faces systemic barriers to access is so much fun.”
~said no-one ever

Larger versions follow:

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